Tag Archives: media

The Ochelli Effect: Pop goes animated sex and violence

From Ochelli.com

Friend of the show and fellow radio host Pearse Redmond joins Chuck on short notice to capture the current zeitgeist in a two hour discussion. Examining all things ranging from the alleged protests being planned on November 4 2017 to the less than likely chances of success for those that wish to remove the twisted thorn of sexual violence and lust for blood that may or may not be uniquely American in it’s intensity. What of the mass shooting in Vegas? Is there such a thing as Liberalism any longer? Are government agencies conducting data collection with the new trump spin on the agenda? What in the Hell is actually wrong with the man-child Trump? Guess we’ll see? Sadly no one noticed Roger Stone recently? Wars,Rumors of Wars, News , Rumors of News? Pop goes animated sex and violence Is stupidity and thus support for Agent Orange a regional consideration? By The way is Puerto Rico all good now? How are you actually doing? All this, Pop goes animated sex and violence, bad jokes, hunting for humans, the Bundy ranch events , and a lot more on this Friday Ochelli Effect.

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Porkins Policy Radio episode 93 What Ever Happened to Egypt with Caram Kapp

Today I am joined by friend of the show Caram Kapp. Caram was last on episode 42 The Homeland Hackers, and returns to discuss the Egyptian uprising six years later. We start off by discussing the basics of the uprising and some of the behind the scenes actors. Caram explains his own experiences as an Egyptian, and as someone who was there on the ground around this time. We touch on the rumors of Western manipulation and how some of these allegations have overshadowed the real life grievances of the Egyptian populace and their reasons for wanting to get rid of Mubarak. Caram and I then move onto the two most important actors of the revolution (The Muslim Brotherhood and the Army) and how they became the ultimate arbiters of the revolution. Caram talks about his time in Cairo just after Brotherhood leader Muhammad Morsi was elected. Caram describes the parallels between Morsi and his brief tenure as president to that of Donald Trump. We talk about similarities in both personality and demeanor, as well as the ways in which Morsi represented “change” and ran on a campaign of making “Egypt Great Again.” Caram and I also discuss the notion that Morsi or those around him were well aware of the realities and influence of the Egyptian military, and understood that they may have been used as a stopgap to put the military back in place.

We expand on this more in the second hour exploring other parallels between Trump, Morsi, and current Egyptian President al-Sisi. Caram and I look at the ways in which al-Sisi and Trump have managed to normalize the military and the police, even when engaging in extreme behavior. Later Caram and I look at some of the recent geopolitical developments in Egypt and how they mirror actions here in the US. We look at the escalating tensions between Sudan and Egypt over the contested Halayeb Triangle and how this mimics Trump’s rhetoric against Mexico. Caram and I also discuss the current state of Egyptian media which like the revolution has returned right back to where it started. Caram and I finish off by looking at where Egypt may be headed and why it has lost influence within the Arab world, and has become one of the forgotten aspects of the Arab Spring.

Download PPR episode 93

Show Notes:

@dot_seekay

Caramblogage

Walls of Freedom

Spring Lessons

PPR episode 42 The Homeland Hackers

Egypt sentences Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed al-Badie to 25 years in prison

Court postpones retrial of Morsi, MB leaders to May 17

New photo of Mubarak from inside his residence in Helioplis

Despite talk of good relations, security concerns darken Egypt-Sudan ties

Egyptian troops shoot at Sudanese miners near borders: offical

Under the radar: Is this the stage for Africa’s next war?

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ClandesTime 101 Nightcrawler

From SpyCulture:

Nightcrawler is one of those rare films that is beautifully written, very well executed and is about something that actual matters. It tells the story of Lou Bloom, a young man in poverty-struck Los Angeles who gets into nightcrawling – filming violent crimes and accidents and selling the footage to TV news. In this episode Pearse and I conduct an extensive analysis and review of the film, exploring many different interpretations that often contradict each other. Is Lou a sociopath, or the product of economic circumstances and a media culture that turns violence into a fetish? Are his cohorts Rick (his assistant) and Nina (the director of the news channel) just as guilty and complicit in what happens? Is his rival nightcrawler Joe Loder actually worse than Lou? These and many more questions are explored in this epic discussion.

Download ClandesTime episode 101

Syrian civil war coverage

Media coverage during any conflict is always fraught with propaganda and distortions. The civil war in Syria is no different. In an age where most people receive their news from television, the various media outlets reporting on Syria have been plagued with biased views of the situation.

At one time Al Jazeera was seen as a bastion of independent journalism in the Middle East. Their coverage of the Iraq War and the Egyptian revolution were hailed by many in the region for their fair and unbiased reporting. Unfortunately this is not the case in Syria. As the below news segment demonstrates, Al Jazeera’s coverage has been co-opted by the Qatari government. They are still framing the narrative as a fight between good and evil. The FSA in the minds of Al Jazeera is a galant and brave rebel army fighting the evil Assad regime. As the Syrian National Council lackey says, the just FSA is retreating from their newly conquered territories in Damascus, so as to protect the civilian population. Note too, that all of this information is gained through YouTube videos, and reporters from neighboring countries. The great Arab news outlet doesn’t have anyone on the ground.

Russia Today’s coverage of the Syrian civil war is much more nuanced. RT is funded by the Kremlin, so there is a bias and slant to their coverage. But if people are willing to eat up Qatari and Western propaganda, why not eat some Russian as well. RT manages to frame the narrative is more realistic manner. This is no longer a peaceful protest movement. Instead this is a civil war in which a plethora of factions are all vying for power. No one controls the country. RT is also quick to point out that the Syrian National Council has no serious backing within Syria. Most importantly RT actually has someone there on the ground in Damascus with the FSA. They don’t have a correspondent in Beirut Skyping with activists in Syria.

Take any and all coverage of Syria with a grain of salt. With that in mind though, seek out a variety of media coverage.

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