Tag Archives: military

Porkins Policy Radio episode 99 National Security Cinema with Matthew Alford and Tom Secker

Tom Secker and Matthew Alford join me today to discuss their brand new book National Security Cinema: The Shocking New Evidence of Government Control in Hollywood. We begin by talking about the overall structure of the book and why Tom and Matt decided to write it. Matt and Tom talk about how this book is different from other scholarly books on the topic of government influence in Hollywood and entertainment at large. Tom and Matt talk about the wealth of new research that they discovered which shows that this influence has only increased over time. The three of us examine DOD entertainment liaison head, Phil Strubb, and critique his claim that he only plays a minor role in Hollywood. We look at films such Contact, who in exchange for a few military trucks altered every subversive comment on the military, or simply wrote them out of entire scenes. We talk about how powerful a tool this is not just in presenting a particular image, but in ensuring that a particular image is never know to the viewing public. We discuss how the Pentagon continually wants a benevolent representation of themselves even though they continually boast to the media that they are the most destructive force on the planet. We also talk about the Terminator franchise which manages to instill the message that nuclear war isn’t so bad and that the military will always be there to help afterwards.

In the second hour we continue looking at several other cases studies including Hotel Rwanda, Rules of Engagement, and Thirteen Days. In the case of Hotel Rwanda Matt explains how this movie followed all of the US State Department’s talking points about the 1994 Rwandan genocide with no direct influence from the government. Tom breaks down the numerous changes to the structure on Rules of Engagement which would eventually result in arguably the most racist American film about an Arab nation to date. We also focus on the corporatization of the film industry in tandem with the national security state. The three of us rant about the blatant use of product placement in films today and how this is another piece of national security cinema. We end on a slightly positive note by talking about what can be done to combat this pervasive and dangerous problem. Tom and Matt also give some examples from the book of filmmakers which have actively fought against the national security states influence in cinema.

Download PPR episode 99

Show Notes:

National Security Cinema (paperback)

National Security Cinema (Kindle)

The Writer With No Hands

Porkins Policy Radio episode 17 War Tax Resister David M. Gross

On this week’s episode we had the pleasure of speaking with war tax resister David M. Gross.  David has been actively resisting war taxes since 2003 after the onset of the Iraq war.  We discuss the methods that one can use to resist the government’s confiscation of  personal income, the history of war tax resistance, as well as the broader issue of tax resistance.

Download PPR episode 17

Show Notes:

The Picket Line

99 Tactics of Successful Tax Resistance Campaigns

Sample Chapter of 99 Tactics of Successful Tax Resistance Campaigns


@99Tactics

National War Tax Resistance Coordinating Committee

War Resisters League pie chart on distribution of Federal Income Tax

NWTRCC breakdown of graphs and charts

Hang Up On War! Telephone Tax Resistance

Music:

Terrence Parker – “Candy Man” (Sweet vocal mix)

Terrence Parker – “Something Here” (Cerky Cakes edit)

Obama to Hollywood: “Don’t glorify guns, war is fine though”

According to our Dear Leader Hollywood needs to stop glorifying guns. Speaking before a room of Hollywood executives Obama proclaimed “We gotta make sure that we’re not glorifying it…” “Because the stories you tell shape our children’s payroll and their lives.”

Well, where to begin with this dribble. The man who’s administration funds and foments armed conflicts around the world doesn’t want Hollywood to make guns look cool. He seemingly has no problem with the constant stream of pro-war, pro-state propaganda that Hollywood churns out on a monthly basis. It’s wrong to have a movie that features an individual using a hand gun, but fine to team up with Hollywood execs to make make films which glorify the systematic slaughter and occupation of other human beings. The incestuous affair between Hollywood and the murray industrial complex seems to have no bearing whatsoever on the peace president. It is true that the stories Hollywood creates shape children’s lives. Popular culture has a profound influence over the American people. Hence, Hollywood and the military work together to produce films that brainwash children into joining up and murdering people in foreign lands. Oh and by the way they do this occasionally with the use of automatic guns.

Obama and Kerry will continue providing aid to nations using child soldiers

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The government shutdown isn’t going to stop the White House from providing military aid to nations that employ child solders. Obama and Kerry waived provisions in the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008, to allow them to provide military aid to Yemen, South Sudan, Chad, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Read the full article from RT here.

U.S. admits it was wrong on Taliban attacks in Afgahnistan

Woops.  That is what the U.S. government is saying in regards to it’s data on Taliban attacks in the year 2012.  The government for months now has been touting reports that Taliban violence has been down more than ever.  Obama uses this as a way to show that his surge worked.  Well it turns out that due to a “clerical error”  all of that was completely false, and instead the level of attacks by the Taliban against international forces has not changed at all from 2011.  No doubt the war criminal in chief and the rest of his minions are feeling pretty sore about all this.  Kelly Vlahos has a really interesting article discussing the “clerical error” in which she brings up another lie we were told about the goings on in Afghanistan.  She discusses the erroneous statements that Gen. Petraeus made regarding the decline of IED attacks, which also turned out to be completely and utterly false, as in the same vain as the reports on Taliban violence that are now apparently untrue.  In essence these perfect pictures of Afghanistan that are presented to us are always false or at least greatly exaggerated.  Vlahos also points out that the military spent in 2009 a horrendous “$4.7 billion a year on ‘strategic communications, ‘ which included $1.6 billion for  recruitment and $547 million for public affairs at home.”  Strategic communications is military jargon for military propaganda designed to make the military look like a gentle, benevolent, and above all else loved force for good.  Seems as if that $1.6 billion that stolen from the American people didn’t really pay off.  Dam those clerical errors!

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